Our Seminars / 2021 Notre Dame

The Phoenix Institute 2021 Notre Dame Summer Seminar for the Study of Western Institutions

JUNE 26, 2021 – JULY 24, 2021

We are ready for the 2021 Phoenix Institute 2021 Summer Seminar for the Study of Western Institutions. Take a look at the newest updates.
 
1. ACADEMIC PROGRAM
The academic content of the 2021 program has been adapted to the times we are living in. All students will have two basic options you can choose from. See below for details.
 
2. COST
The tuition for the 2021 program will be 3,350 USD or 4,400 USD, depending on the basic option each student chooses to follow. See below for details.
 
3. COVID-19
Special requirements will apply due to the Covid-19 pandemic (for starters, all participants must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 by June 13, 2020). See below for details. 

The Opening Seminar is to be held on the morning of Sunday, June 27. Attendance is compulsory for all students.

The Opening Seminar will provide a proper introduction to the summer course as a whole. Students will meet their professors, classmates, and coordinators. Also in the seminar, among other relevant information, students will review the calendar of curricular and extracurricular activities, and learn all they need to know about life at Notre Dame.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2021 Phoenix Institute summer seminar will include two Notre Dame in-person courses and one Phoenix Institute hybrid course. 
 
Students will have the option to:
 
Option 1. Follow one Notre Dame in-person course (Dr. Lewis OR Dr. Brand) and the Phoenix Institute hybrid course (Dr. Rosales).
 
Option 2. Follow the two Notre Dame in-person courses (Dr. Lewis AND Dr. Brand).
 
For information about the financial repercussions of this decision, see the Cost section below.
In-person Notre Dame course
 
Dr. V. Bradley Lewis
 
Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America (2 volumes, 1835, 1840) has been described as the greatest book ever written on democracy and the greatest book ever written on America. In it, Tocqueville perceives nearly all of the important issues related to modern liberal democracies and contextualizes them in his interpretation of the American experience. The book was written to convince Europeans that democracy was inevitable and to prepare them for it so that the transition might be peaceful, moderate and just. Among the issues treated are the rule of law, the relationship between church and state, the activities of civil associations and local government, and the importance of culture and institutions in political life. This course will take Tocqueville’s book as its text in order to develop Tocquevillian themes related to politics and society today.
 
Dr. V. Bradley Lewis. Ph.D. Government and International Studies, University of Notre Dame. M.A., Government and International Studies, University of Notre Dame. B.A., Government and Politics, University of Maryland. Associate Professor at the School of Philosophy of The Catholic University of America. Associate Editor of The American Journal of Jurisprudence.
 
Mechanics of this in-person Notre Dame course. This course will meet in-person Monday through Friday at the University of Notre Dame for 1 hour and 45 minutes for the duration of the course (4 weeks). Upon its satisfactory completion, students will be able to request a transcript with the details of their participation from the Office of the Registrar of the University of Notre Dame.
In-person Notre Dame course
 
Dr. Clinton Brand
 
What do ancient myth-making and medieval cosmology have to do with modern science fiction and stories of space travel and alien civilizations? Well, quite a lot, if you are to appreciate the Space Trilogy of C. S. Lewis. Though not as well known or widely read as his popular Chronicles of Narnia, or the fantasy fiction of his friend J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, Lewis’s Space Trilogy ranks as one of the most probing accomplishments of twentieth-century speculative and mythopoeic fiction with antecedents in the world-making imaginations of Dante and Milton. These three novels (Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength) also offer an intriguing survey of the range and variety of Lewis’s intellectual vitality as a writer, storyteller, literary critic, moral philosopher, and Christian apologist. In this class, we will explore Lewis’s Space Trilogy in relation to his study of the integrated worldview of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, as outlined in The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature, as well as in the context of his pioneering work of moral and educational philosophy, The Abolition of Man. Then we will voyage to Mars in the narrative of Out of the Silent Planet, before another space flight to Venus in Perelandra. Finally, we come back to Earth in That Hideous Strength for Lewis’s dystopian tale of a world beset by scientific materialism and resurgent gnosticism and a novel that offers a searching critique of social engineering and the quest for human perfectibility. Along the way, we will discuss a number of philosophical problems and theological mysteries, including the relationships between language and reality, metaphysics and ethics, fall and redemption, nature and grace, incarnation and atonement, flesh and spirit, sin and charity, morality and politics, science and imagination, among others. The Space Trilogy will take us from the “outer space” of modern science fiction to the “Deep Heaven” of classical and medieval cosmology and then to “this pendent world,” the Earth, as the scene for a drama of academic intrigue and eschatological warfare. 
 
Dr. Clinton Brand. Ph.D., English, Vanderbilt University. M.A. English, Vanderbilt University. B.A., English, University of Dallas. Associate Professor at the English Department of the University of St. Thomas.
 
Mechanics of this in-person Notre Dame course. This course will meet in-person Monday through Friday at the University of Notre Dame for 1 hour and 45 minutes for the duration of the course (4 weeks). Upon its satisfactory completion, students will be able to request a transcript with the details of their participation from the Office of the Registrar of the University of Notre Dame.
Hybrid Phoenix Institute Course
 
Dr. Diego I. Rosales
 
“Who am I?” is the big question that everyone faces sooner or later. Such a question isn’t meant to be answered by the simple pronunciation of the name we were given at birth. This is a question that rises in all its depth and importance when experiences of love, freedom, suffering, beauty and evil, become evident and undeniable. This was the question that Augustine of Hippo posed for the first time in a philosophical key, developing the very first philosophy of the person. In contrast, it is significant that Ancient Greeks did not conceive themselves as ‘persons’ but only as ‘human beings’. They understood each other as a singular case of a general nature or essence, as just one concrete instance of the human species. Hence, we must ask why the Christian experience allowed humanity to conceive human beings as persons. To answer this question, Augustine’s testimony is a vital source within the Western Tradition. With him, the notion of “person” emerged as a concrete reality, irreducible to a case of a species or to a universal essence, characterized by inwardness and intimacy. This course will follow Augustine’s itinerary as a means to understand how the notion of “person” became a philosophical one, leading towards the fundamental consequences that such a notion had in Modernity. Reading materials will include Augustine’s Confessions and selected short texts from The Free Choice of the Will and The City of God.
 
Dr. Diego I. Rosales. Ph.D. Philosophy, Comillas Pontifical University. M.A., Philosophy, National Autonomous University of Mexico. B.A., Philosophy, Panamerican University.
 
Mechanics of this hybrid Phoenix Institute course. Students will meet with the professor and their classmates online two or three times a week (depending on the week). Additionally, students work through online content designed by the professor (with specific weekly deadlines that the students have to meet). Once a week, students will participate in an in-person tutorial session. Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to request a certificate with the details of their participation from the Phoenix Institute.
 
OPTION 1. One in-person Notre Dame course and one hybrid Phoenix Institute course.
 
The cost of the program is 3,350 USD. It includes:
  • Full tuition fee for one in-person Notre Dame course. Students must select one of the two in-person Notre Dame courses (Dr. Lewis OR Dr. Brand courses).
  • Full tuition fee for the Phoenix Institute hybrid course (Dr. Rosales).
  • Double/triple-occupancy accommodations in non-air-conditioned rooms.
  • All applying fees for the use of all libraries and recreational facilities available on the Notre Dame campus (subject to possible limitations due to University COVID-19 health protocols).
 
OPTION 2. Two in-person Notre Dame courses. 
 
The cost of the program is 4,400 USD. It includes:
  • Full tuition fee for the two in-person Notre Dame courses (Dr. Lewis AND Dr. Brand courses).
  • Double/triple-occupancy accommodations in non-air-conditioned rooms.
  • All applying fees for the use of all libraries and recreational facilities available on the Notre Dame campus (subject to possible limitations due to University COVID-19 health protocols).

INITIAL PAYMENT

In both cases (Options 1 and 2), a 300 USD non-refundable initial payment will be needed for registration 72 hours after a student is notified of their acceptance to the summer program.

MEAL PLAN (OPTIONAL)

The 2021 tuition does NOT include meals. Students interested in purchasing an optional meal plan can do so for 191.10 USD for 15 meals.

CONDITIONS

  • Enrollment to both Summer Programs is limited.
  • General registration will remain open until May 31st, 2021.
  • All applications will be processed on a first-come, first-serve basis. Due to high demand, students are encouraged to apply as early as possible.
  • The full cost of the program’s tuition fee must be covered by June 14th, 2021.
  • If you have not completed it thus far, the first step to apply is by filling out the Pre-Registration form that can be found here.
  • For the full description of the 2021 Admission Procedure click here.

The University of Notre Dame requires all Phoenix Institute students to be vaccinated for COVID-19 before the start of the summer program with a vaccine approved by a US federal agency. If you have received a COVID-19 vaccine other than Pfizer, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson, instructions will be provided so you can request special approval from the University Health Services.

If you are unable to get a COVID-19 vaccine while outside the U.S., the University of Notre Dame will help you register for the vaccine in the South Bend community for you to get vaccinated within 72 hours upon arriving on campus.

Participants will need to observe all applicable Covid-19 Notre Dame protocols and guidelines for the duration of the summer program. For more information on what such protocols and guidelines might be, visit: https://here.nd.edu
 
The Phoenix Institute reserves the right to reschedule the summer program for 2022 if the ongoing developments require so.

Because of the high cost of medical treatment in the United States, all students must purchase a medical insurance policy prior to arrival at the University of Notre Dame. The Phoenix Institute cannot provide for any medical care or medical costs and insurance coverage.

Participants who have not sent the Phoenix Institute written proof of their medical insurance coverage by June 14, 2021, will not be admitted to the summer program.

The Seminar will be held at the University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana.

TRAVEL ALTERNATIVES FROM CHICAGO TO THE UNIVERSITY’S CAMPUS

By bus: Coach USA has bus-shuttles several times a day between both Chicago O’Hare and Chicago Midway airports and Notre Dames campus.

By train: The South Shore Line trains run directly from the Chicago Loop (corner of Michigan and Randolph) to South Bend Regional Airport in South Bend (about a two-hour trip). From the South Bend airport, the Notre Dame campus is approximately a 15-minute ride by car.

By car: The University is about two hours by car from Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport and about 90 minutes from Midway International Airport.

By plane: There are a few airlines that fly to the South Bend Regional Airport. Please consider that this is NOT an international airport. 

Many travel restrictions are in place worldwide due to Covid 19. Make sure you understand and follow the United States and airlines’ requirements related to travel, testing, or quarantine while planning your participation in the summer program. If you do not follow such requirements, you may be denied entry to the United States.

The University of Notre Dame will not require foreign students to get a student visa in order to participate in our summer programs (a regular B2 visa will suffice).

Arrival at ND campus: Saturday, June 26

Opening Seminar: Sunday, June 27 (morning)

First day of classes: Monday, June 28

Last day of classes: Friday, July 23

Last day at ND campus: Saturday, July 24 (by midday)

2021 GERHART NIEMEYER GRADUATION SEMINAR (FOR THIRD YEAR STUDENTS)

The Gerhart Niemeyer Graduation Seminar is the academic activity through which Phoenix senior students (Third Year) complete the Institute’s Program in Advanced Social, Economic, and Political Studies.
Third Year students are expected to arrive on campus on Wednesday, June 23, three days before the rest of the group.
The Graduation Seminar will cost $120.00 USD (TBC).