Our Seminars / 2022 Notre Dame

The Phoenix Institute 2022 Notre Dame Summer Seminar for the Study of Western Institutions

JUNE 25, 2022 – JULY 23, 2022

I. 2022 AT A GLANCE

ACADEMIC PROGRAM

The courses that will be offered this summer are:

**Detailed course descriptions are available below.**
 

TUITION AND FEES

Tuition for the 2022 program will be 3,600 USD or 4,800 USD, depending on the combination of courses you choose to follow. **See below for details.**
 

COVID-19

Special requirements will apply due to the Covid-19 pandemic (for starters, all participants must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19, including boosters). **See below for details.**

Please notice that all students must purchase the medical insurance policy offered by the University of Notre Dame. **See below for details.**

Main Building
ND Dr. Evans y Rose
2. ACADEMIC INFORMATION

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2022 program offers two Notre Dame in-person courses and one Phoenix Institute hybrid course. As a student, you will have the option to:

– Option 1. Follow one Notre Dame in-person course (Dr. Lewis OR Dr. Brand) and the Phoenix Institute hybrid course (Dr. Rosales).

– Option 2. Follow the two Notre Dame in-person courses (Dr. Lewis AND Dr. Brand). 

**See below for information about the financial repercussions of this decision.**

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
In-person Notre Dame course
 

Dr. V. Bradley Lewis
Catholic University of America

Thucydides’s History of the Peloponnesian War is one of the greatest historical narratives ever produced, telling the story of the epic struggle between democratic Athens and oligarchic Sparta and their allies that took place between 431 and 404 BC. But it is much more: along the way, Thucydides presents deep analyses of the nature of democracy and other political regimes, the moral hazards of empire, justice among nations, and the causes of war. He penetrates to the roots of political life in human nature. His reflections are thus not only of historical interest but take us to matters of permanent relevance in human affairs.
We will study the whole work in the edition of Robert B. Strassler, The Landmark Thucydides (The Free Press, 1998). We will also consider the reaction to cultural and moral aspects of the war as expressed in Plato’s dialogue, Gorgias.
 

Dr. V. Bradley Lewis. Ph.D. Government and International Studies, University of Notre Dame. M.A., Government and International Studies, University of Notre Dame. B.A., Government and Politics, University of Maryland. Associate Professor at the School of Philosophy of The Catholic University of America. Associate Editor of The American Journal of Jurisprudence.

Mechanics of this in-person Notre Dame course. This course will meet in-person Monday through Friday at the University of Notre Dame for 1 hour and 45 minutes for the duration of the course (4 weeks). Upon its satisfactory completion, students will be able to request a transcript with the details of their participation from the Office of the Registrar of the University of Notre Dame.

In-person Notre Dame course
 
Dr. Clinton Brand
University of St. Thomas
 
Seven hundred years after his death and the publication of the Divine Comedy, Dante’s great poem remains as vital and challenging today, as it was when it first appeared complete in 1321. Dante’s Commedia narrates an epic journey through the realms of the afterlife—Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise. It undertakes a study of the condition of souls after death (status animarum post mortem), but it also challenges its readers to an experience of self-examination and a survey of the condition of our souls in this life (status animarum in vitam). This course invites a focused reading of the Divine Comedy in relation to the aims and ends of education, specifically a liberal arts education directed to freeing minds and souls for the discovery and propagation of truth, goodness and beauty, and for the sake of human flourishing.

 As we shall see, Dante builds into his poem a curriculum of study, including not only reflections on the Trivium (grammar, logic, and rhetoric) and Quadrivium (arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy) but also engagement with the whole scope of what we call the “humanities” – those disciplines dedicated to understanding human things, including history, politics, literature, psychology, philosophy, and theology. In our reading of the Inferno, we will undergo an education in moral reasoning and interpersonal interpretation. Then we will climb our way up the Purgatorio and experience the lessons of works and worship and the integral formation of the imagination. Finally, we will ascend through the Paradiso and learn about love to gain a love of learning amid the prismatic colors of what Dante calls luce intellettual piena d’amore (“intellectual light full of love”). In that light, we will reflect upon Dante’s abiding relevance for education today as a torch for those who walk in darkness and find themselves “midway in the journey of our life” (Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita)

Dr. Clinton Brand. Ph.D., English, Vanderbilt University. M.A. English, Vanderbilt University. B.A., English, University of Dallas. Associate Professor at the English Department of the University of St. Thomas.

Mechanics of this in-person Notre Dame course. This course will meet in-person Monday through Friday at the University of Notre Dame for 1 hour and 45 minutes for the duration of the course (4 weeks). Upon its satisfactory completion, students will be able to request a transcript with the details of their participation from the Office of the Registrar of the University of Notre Dame.

Hybrid Phoenix Institute Course

Dr. Diego I. Rosales
Hápax Action Sciences Institute

What does it mean to be modern? It seems that modernity means technology, science, freedom, and democracy. Nevertheless, it is also likely that it means fragmentation, isolation, bureaucratism, nihilism, or totalitarianism. The answer to this question is crucial since there is no human being that does not wonder what it means to live. At some point, our existence becomes a question in and of itself: who am I and what am I doing with my life? In our case, these questions can only be answered within a specific context: Modernity. We were born in a world that calls itself modern, and our identity depends on the fulfillment or failure of the modern project. Hannah Arendt devoted much of her work to understanding modernity as a historical and anthropological category. She was a keen observer of the wellbeing and the progress the Modern world brought with it. At the same time, she unequivocally denounced the radical evil Modernity itself casts on humanity.
In this course, we will aim to understand what the Modern way of living is. We will critically analyze the existential situation in which human beings have placed themselves by being modern. To situate this analysis, we will read works by three authors who will help us gain a proper understanding of modernity: Franz Kafka, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and T.S. Eliot followed by the reading and discussion of a series of essays by Hannah Arendt, with a special emphasis on The Human Condition.

Dr. Diego I. Rosales. Ph.D. Philosophy, Comillas Pontifical University. M.A., Philosophy, National Autonomous University of Mexico. B.A., Philosophy, Panamerican University. Senior Researcher at Hápax Action Sciences Institute.

Mechanics of this hybrid Phoenix Institute course. Students will meet with the professor and their classmates online two or three times a week (depending on the week). The professor will be at Notre Dame to meet in person with the students during the first days of the program. The course’s Teaching Assistant will be physically present at the University of Notre Dame for the duration of the course. Twice a week, students will participate in an in-person one-hour-long tutorial session. Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to request a certificate with the details of their participation from the Phoenix Institute.

Orientation is to be held on the morning of Sunday, June 26. Attendance is compulsory for all students.

This orientation session will provide you with a proper introduction to the summer course as a whole. As a student, you will meet your professors, classmates, and coordinators. You also will receive the official calendar of curricular and extracurricular activities and learn all you need to know about life at Notre Dame.

FOR THIRD YEAR STUDENTS ONLY

The Gerhart Niemeyer Graduation Seminar is the academic activity through which Phoenix senior students (third-year) complete the Institute’s Program in Advanced Social, Economic, and Political Studies.

More information regarding this seminar will be shared shortly.

3. TUITION, FEES, AND ADDITIONAL COSTS

The cost of the summer program depends on which course options you selected:

Option 1. One in-person Notre Dame course and one hybrid Phoenix Institute course.

The cost of the program is 3,600 USD. It includes:

  • Full tuition fee for one in-person Notre Dame course (must select one of the two in-person Notre Dame courses, Dr. Lewis or Dr. Brand course).
  • Full tuition fee for the Phoenix Institute hybrid course (Dr. Rosales).
  • Double/triple-occupancy accommodations in non-air-conditioned rooms.
  • All applying fees for the use of all libraries and recreational facilities available on the Notre Dame campus (subject to possible limitations due to University COVID-19 health protocols).

Option 2. Two in-person Notre Dame courses.

The cost of the program is 4,800 USD. It includes:

  • Full tuition fee for the two in-person Notre Dame courses (Dr. Lewis and Dr. Brand courses).
  • Double/triple-occupancy accommodations in non-air-conditioned rooms.
  • All applying fees for the use of all libraries and recreational facilities available on the Notre Dame campus (subject to possible limitations due to University COVID-19 health protocols).

To complete your enrollment, and regardless of the course option you selected( Options 1 or 2), you will need to make a non-refundable 300 USD initial payment within72 hours after you are notified of your acceptance to the summer program.

The Phoenix Institute cannot provide for any medical care or medical costs and insurance coverage.

Because of the high cost of medical treatment in the United States, ALL students must purchase the medical insurance policy offered by the University of Notre Dame. You will be required to make the payment before you arrive at the University of Notre Dame, even though it will be charged to your student account during the Summer Seminar. You will receive further information on this requirement upon your acceptance to the summer program.

In the meantime, please notice that this insurance would cover any vaccine requirements you might have and any testing you would need at University Health System (including a mandatory TB test). It also covers all services at Notre Dame’s University Health System.

The 2022 tuition does NOT include meals. Students interested in optional meal plans will be able to purchase 15-meals packs. More information about these optional sets will become available shortly.

4. ADDITIONAL RELEVANT INFORMATION

Phoenix Institute students must comply with all applicable Notre Dame regulations regarding COVID-19 vaccination and boosters. To this day, this means that, as members of the Notre Dame community, Phoenix Institute students are required to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19. To be considered fully vaccinated, students, faculty, and staff must receive two shots of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, or a single shot of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, plus a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna booster. For more information on the vaccination/booster requirement policy, click here.

Moreover, participants will need to observe any applicable Covid-19 Notre Dame protocols and guidelines for the duration of the summer program. For more information on what such protocols and guidelines might be, click here.

The Phoenix Institute reserves the right to reschedule the summer program for 2022 if the ongoing developments require so.

The Seminar will be held at the University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana.

TRAVEL ALTERNATIVES FROM CHICAGO TO THE UNIVERSITY’S CAMPUS

By bus: Coach USA has bus-shuttles several times a day between both Chicago O’Hare and Chicago Midway airports and Notre Dames campus.

By train: The South Shore Line trains run directly from the Chicago Loop (corner of Michigan and Randolph) to South Bend Regional Airport in South Bend (about a two-hour trip). From the South Bend airport, the Notre Dame campus is approximately a 15-minute ride by car.

By car: The University is about two hours by car from Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport and about 90 minutes from Midway International Airport.

By plane: There are a few airlines that fly to the South Bend Regional Airport. Please consider that this is NOT an international airport. 

Please notice that availability and schedules are subject to changes and restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Many travel restrictions are in place worldwide due to COVID 19. Make sure you understand and follow the United States and airlines’ requirements related to travel, testing, or quarantine while planning your participation in the summer program. If you do not follow such requirements, you may be denied entry to the United States.

Clint's class
Law library at Notre Dame
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The University of Notre Dame will not require foreign students to get a student visa to participate in our summer programs: a regular B2 visa will suffice.

Enrollment is limited.

General registration will remain open until March 31st, 2022.

• All candidates (first-year, second-year, and third-year students alike) must begin their registration procedure by filling out the Pre-Registration form that can be found here.

Once filled, you will receive an email with further instructions.

Arrival at ND campus: Saturday, June 25

Orientation (mandatory): Sunday, June 26 (morning)

First day of classes: Monday, June 27

Last day of classes: Friday, July 22

Last day at ND campus: Saturday, July 23 (by midday)